Curtiss SNC Falcon


The Curtiss SNC/CW-22 was a more successful development of the CW-19 which saw
only limited production, with most of those built going to China (20) and Cuba (3).

CW-19R N30419 is seen here at St. Louis in 1937.


Missouri Historical Society - Larger Image



The second production SNC-1, BuNo. 6291, photographed on May 17th, 1941.


Missouri Historical Society - Larger Image



A few views of BuNo. 6291 in flight near the Curtiss facility in St. Louis.
These photos were possibly taken on the occasion of the ship's first flight, and
a few shots from this series were used extensively in Curtiss advertising.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image


Project 914 Archives - Larger Image



This was scanned from a lithographic print that was part of a series of full-color
promotional prints first issued by Curtiss either early in the war or just prior to the war.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



An SNC-1 from NAS Anacostia, Washington D.C., August 13th, 1941.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



SNC-1s of VN-12 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida warming up for a hop on December 20th, 1941.
These ships would be transferred to NAAF Green Cove Springs, Florida the following year.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



A look at SNC-1 #24 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida, January 8th, 1942.
This ship can also be seen in the above photo, second in line.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



SNC-1 BuNo.6342, from an as yet unidentified outfit; possibly NAS Jacksonville.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



Probably the most well-known image of the Curtiss SNC-1, this shot of two ABGs is one of a series
of photographs taken at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas by Office of War Information photographer
Howard R. Hollem in August of 1942. The original caption for this photo reads:

"Feeding an SNC advanced training plane its essential supply of gasoline is done by sailor mechanics
at the Naval Air Base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Standing on the wing is Floyd Helphrey who came from Iowa
to join the Navy early in the year. At right is W. Gardner of Illinois who used to be a crane operator."



Library of Congress FSA/OWI Collection (Howard R. Hollem photo) - Larger Image



"Naval air base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Sailors stationed at the naval air base in
Corpus Christi, Texas, check the pilot seat of an SNC advance training plane."



Library of Congress FSA/OWI Collection (Howard R. Hollem photo) - Larger Image



Another from a different series, same photographer...

"Mrs. Virginia Davis, a riveter in the assembly and repair department of the Naval air base,
supervises Chas. Potter, a NYA trainee from Michigan; Corpus Christi, Texas. After eight weeks
of training he will go into civil service. Should he be inducted or enlist in the armed
service, he will be valuable to mechanized units of the Army or Navy."



Library of Congress FSA/OWI Collection (Howard R. Hollem photo) - Larger Image



The NACA seems to have had at least one example of dang near every type of American
military aircraft back in the day, including this SNC-1 which was photographed at the
Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Virginia on April 30th, 1942.


NASA Langley Research Center - Larger Image



A fella identified on the original print only as 'Joe' sits with 'Bert', a CW-22
originally built for the Royal Netherlands East Indies Air Force but pressed into
service with the USAAF. I haven't done much research on the subject as yet, but hope
to present a feature page for these Falcons and their CW-21 siblings in the future.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



A Uruguayan pilot with CW-22B #202 at the Military School of Aeronautics in June of 1944.


Project 914 Archives (S.Donacik collection) - Larger Image



One of fifty CW-22Bs supplied to Turkey.


Turk Hava Kuvvetleri - Larger Image



This Turkish CW-22B suffered an 'oopsie' in the Ethiopian desert on December 15th, 1942.


From: Air Combat Special - Military Aircraft Camouflage & Markings Vol.1 Issue #2 - Larger Image


From: Air Combat Special - Military Aircraft Camouflage & Markings Vol.1 Issue #2 - Larger Image



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